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Badger
06-30-2013, 06:56 PM
Hi all,
Something that I am looking forward to in Hex is the fact that I will be paying the same for boosters as players in other nations. Apart from exchange rate, which is fine, I won't have to worry about 3 middle men which is what we have had to deal with in NZ for WoWTCG, and I guess every other game product that has come to these shores.

For WoWTCG, Cryptozoic bases its organised play programme on the volume of sales in a country. While I have always supported my local game store for buying boxes, many players in our country just buy through online distributers at half the cost, (which I also do for singles).

For this reason it has always looked like players outside the US are not spending money on the game because the online sales are accredited to having being purchased in the USA.

Now that Hex will be fully online with us all buying from the one location, what impact do you think that will have on how Cryptozoic view international sales of the other products and do you think it will impact on how they choose where to spend their organised play dollars for those games?

Also, does anyone have any predictions on what their sales data might show now for USA vs non USA sales in WoWTCG and how that might differ for Hex?

Atomzed
07-01-2013, 02:17 AM
I think the location of sales won't matter in a digital game. The digital game is not bounded by geography, so they won't have to break down the sales into geographical regions.

As for their other products, I suspect that it will stay the same. Primary focus will be on USA, simply because distribution is much easier.

Badger
07-01-2013, 03:27 AM
So you suspect they won't track sales data by region?

Chiany
07-01-2013, 03:35 AM
So you suspect they won't track sales data by region?

I expect they will track it, but doubt if they actively are gonna do something with it.

blakegrandon
07-01-2013, 05:37 AM
I expect they will track it, but doubt if they actively are gonna do something with it.

I have to disagree, sales data based on location is crucial to digital games to determine what languages to translate the games into, what marketing efforts to take in each country, and also what laws they need to make sure they're following.

1. Not everyone speaks English(this is coming from a guy who only speaks English), and localization takes time and a lot of money.

2. Laws vary country to country, I doubt you'll be buying boosters in North Korea for example, or if so it'll probably require giving kickbacks to the NK government and also dealing with embargo's and such.

3. Marketing. Everyone is acting like Hex will be instantly known just because they're digital. Marketing still requires money, time, and also knowing your demographics. I was reading the other thread where people were shooting down distribution models involving local game stores on the basis that Hex is digital and thus has no use for a physical presence, but that is ignoring the real potential physical stores have to boost a customer base.

Acquiring customers and knowing where they're located, how they were acquired, and what their culture is like is crucial to running a digital only gaming company.

Plus you also have to account for different methods of people paying which on a global scale can be VERY difficult.

Globalization isn't as simple as turning the servers on, running some google ads, and watching the entire world start to play.

hex_colin
07-01-2013, 05:46 AM
1. ... localization takes time and a lot of money.


This used to be the case, not so much now as long as you design the software to support localization. Lots of great crowd-sourcing paths for localization that allows you to do it in a fraction of the time (and therefore cost).

blakegrandon
07-01-2013, 07:13 AM
This used to be the case, not so much now as long as you design the software to support localization. Lots of great crowd-sourcing paths for localization that allows you to do it in a fraction of the time (and therefore cost).

Yea, I guess modern advances in software/tech can help with localization. That still doesn't mean it doesn't cost anything, you have to pay for all that R&D somehow...

That said,I think people underestimate how much marketing a game needs to do in order to be successful, and usually it's a good idea to know where your player base is in order to decide how much to market a geographic area.

This might sound bad, but whenever I hear global distribution I think Oh great, we're going to have a huge influx of Nigerian oil barons trying to unload their game merchandise at a fraction of the price.