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Zomnivore
08-28-2013, 10:50 AM
What sort of sensations do card games evoke?

I've played several vid. games and always in my gut in the noggin there's a muddled sensation of what gameplay 'feels like' in an abstract way.

For me the fast paced dynamic gameplay of TF2 and other sorts of fps create a sensation of what I think of as dance.

Forging through dynamic patterns of movement dodging and aligning shots, rapid target acquisition and either being more dynamic and adaptable or failing.

Being more 'in the flow' or not seemed like an important piece of why that game was important to me, and valuable as an artistic experience instead of a chump and dump fps.


What sort of Synesthesia is there to enjoy in a tactical game?

Kami
08-28-2013, 10:59 AM
Tactical games remind me of war. If you've ever read Sun Tzu's Art of War, you might feel the same way.

Svenn
08-28-2013, 11:03 AM
Card games are critical thinking games... a battle of wits. It's the same kind of thing as chess. I don't really think there's a "sensation" to a card game. Tactical games are more about the mind and problem solving than artistic experience or sensations.

MoikPEI
08-28-2013, 11:23 AM
A guy at work has synesthesia in the biological way where auditory stimuli also has a taste.
Thought this thread was going to be about how to make Hex 'pretty sweet' in the literal sense. :/

vickrpg
08-28-2013, 11:23 AM
Synesthesia is a neurological condition in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway... I do not have this condition.
Most people don't.

Games don't smell, sound, physocally (touch based) feel, look or taste like anything to me.

But I do experience some sort of emotional connection when i play RPGs and Other games with involved stories, that I do not experience with fighting or action games. Card games also make me think of Chess matches, even when deck building.


Edit:
You wrote your post while I was writing mine. =)


A guy at work has synesthesia in the biological way where auditory stimuli also has a taste.
Thought this thread was going to be about how to make Hex 'pretty sweet' in the literal sense. :/

Love the pun!

FeelNFine
08-28-2013, 11:25 AM
This might sound weird, but I get a sense of intimate exploration. When I play MTG, even with new people, everyone is drawn to certain favorite methods, certain cards just feel right to them. When you play a homemade deck you are getting a deep reflection into their character.

Granted in a competitive setting, I'd say it feels more like saber fencing. That kind of step-respond-momentum management, setting up a fatal strike rings heaviest with me.

Vibraxus
08-28-2013, 11:25 AM
A guy at work has synesthesia in the biological way where auditory stimuli also has a taste.
Thought this thread was going to be about how to make Hex 'pretty sweet' in the literal sense. :/

I have a mild "case" of tourettes if that counts. And what sets me off is when Im not focusing on something intently. It is one reason why I am almost always multitasking in some way, otherwise Ill twitch and sometimes make a noise.

FeelNFine
08-28-2013, 11:31 AM
My room mate in college had tourettes, and he'd do something similar wth MTG. To keep himself entrenched in the game, he'd read flavor texts, study the small details in the art, stuff like that. It'd get him in trouble occasionally, if he went on a tangent I could often figure out what card he had in hand based on the flavor text that I figured would set off that tangent :P

Vibraxus
08-28-2013, 11:40 AM
My room mate in college had tourettes, and he'd do something similar wth MTG. To keep himself entrenched in the game, he'd read flavor texts, study the small details in the art, stuff like that. It'd get him in trouble occasionally, if he went on a tangent I could often figure out what card he had in hand based on the flavor text that I figured would set off that tangent :P

You can only read a flavor text so many times, if Im playin in a draft Ill people watch, read flavor, try to plan my next move...sing something in my head...anything to keep the old brain as active as I possibly can. I get sick of people looking at me and asking "What was that" when I twitch or make a noise. Since it is quite mild I can usually keep it at bay unless Im just relaxing watching TV or only playing a game with no other stimuli.

Shadowelf
08-28-2013, 11:41 AM
Depends on the match's importance...when i reach a final of a 30 man tourney with a box as a reward, i'm having feelings like quickened heart beating and trembling hands; then as the win draws close anticipation and excitement. And if i finally win exultation;

ossuary
08-28-2013, 12:11 PM
This is actually a fascinating subject for conversation (although the thread title is misleading... I was also expecting some kind of call for supporting users with alternate sense perceptions!). Hopefully the trolls won't bombard this thread too...

My cousin actually has synesthesia. Some people who have this experience additional senses along with the normal one for a specific thing (like seeing tastes), and others don't experience the normal sense at all, but instead have it switched with something (this is extremely rare). In my cousin's case, he sees colors in his head when he listens to music. I can only imagine how absolutely breathtaking that must be, when complicated musical tones intermix.

He says that he often gets colors when he talks to people as well, based on their emotional state. Surprisingly, anger is not red, it's a sort of greenish-yellow. His color sense is way more accurate than his normal perception when it comes to this kind of stuff, too; he says he can always tell when someone is being sarcastic even if they are playing the straight man act, because he sees orange when they do. :)

For me, I don't really have any associations with card games like Magic. But when I'm playing a really intense / difficult game, usually oldschool platformer type games, I find that I stop hearing whatever music and sound effects are going on in the game, and get a sort of intense buzzing sound in my ears instead. I always think of it as my "concentrating really hard" sound. It's how I can tell if a game is pushing me to the limits of my skill. ;)

Zomnivore
08-28-2013, 12:36 PM
Games don't smell, sound, physocally (touch based) feel, look or taste like anything to me.


Do you get a sense of motion watching a movie? I don't usually, but I do with video games.

There are more senses than you think. You can feel unbalanced by a game or dizzy yet never move your head, there are interesting sensations going on, and its exciting to think about incorporating them into games by design.

I don't think my thread title was misleading at all, because its exactly what I meant.

Some fps are designed around movement, and by effect can create sensations of movement, 'of dance' of imbalance.

If you think balance isn't a sense you're wrong.

Do you feel sensations of stress due to competition? Of pain? What ways do game design work around these things?

People have attested to the feelings of the phantom limbs and other such things that creates an interesting dialogue about immersion etc. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxwn1w7MJvk

I don't have much experience with card games, but there's certainly someone out there who does and probably can speak to what I'm asking.

ossuary
08-28-2013, 12:43 PM
Well, the whole 5 senses thing is complete and utter BS anyway. The definition people use for that is extremely narrow. Science defines something like 37 senses, including things like balance, heat and cold sensitivity, etc.

It's definitely true that not everybody experiences media in the same way. I don't normally get vertigo or anything like that, but I've played a few games over the years that made me feel uneasy, queasy, or dizzy. Usually from too much going on on screen (sensory overload) rather than perspective, though.

MoikPEI
08-28-2013, 12:55 PM
I get vertigo from long falls in first or third person when the camera faces down.
Doesn't affect me when diving in a plane though.

Zomnivore
08-28-2013, 12:56 PM
I can get a sensation of texture in video games, there's sliding surfaces, and nuanced differences in characteristics of surfaces sticky/rubbery/bouncy.

I do get a sensation of what those surfaces feel like or must feel like, just like I get an imagine in my mind when I read a book. Whether its a different kind of synesthesia or not, doesn't make the term less applicable.

Although I do get a more 'true' sense of motion with fps than I do get of textures. It might just be that texture isn't as important as movement in games, so its not as well staged, and its why I have such a vague sense of it in them.

vickrpg
08-28-2013, 02:06 PM
Do you get a sense of motion watching a movie? I don't usually, but I do with video games.

There are more senses than you think. You can feel unbalanced by a game or dizzy yet never move your head, there are interesting sensations going on, and its exciting to think about incorporating them into games by design.

I don't think my thread title was misleading at all, because its exactly what I meant.

Some fps are designed around movement, and by effect can create sensations of movement, 'of dance' of imbalance.

If you think balance isn't a sense you're wrong.

Do you feel sensations of stress due to competition? Of pain? What ways do game design work around these things?

People have attested to the feelings of the phantom limbs and other such things that creates an interesting dialogue about immersion etc. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxwn1w7MJvk

I don't have much experience with card games, but there's certainly someone out there who does and probably can speak to what I'm asking.

I didn't say I believe none of those are senses. I didn't say you were misleading or wrong either, I just copied and pasted the definition of synesthesia from wikipedia. ;)
I do think Synesthesia is the incorrect word, but I meant no offense. Synesthesia is not someone everyone experiences, and I don't think the experiences described here qualify. Synesthesia is a condition, it is rare and extreme. It shows links to senses unintended by the creators, different and unique to the individual. It allows people to see colors when they hear numbers, or smell things when they are touched. Feeling motion when the creators show simulated motion is not synesthesia. It's immersion. By definition, if it is by design, it isn't synesthetic. And Synesthesia occurs to individuals with the condition whether they are immersed or not.

But I do unserstand what you mean after reading your post. Which is why I flanked my comments with a similar experience to further the conversation. I know negativity and nay saying do nothing to a post and most people don't want to argue semantics (I love it, but I'm an English teacher), so I tried to contribute along with giving my opinion. As I will do now.


I do sense motion with movies and games, yes. I do not feel stress in competition, almost ever actually. I don't believe in stress, but that's another conversation. definitely not pain either.

That ohantom limbs thing is interesting and Incorporating the feelings you describe into game design are definitely something that blows the mind. Have you seen the TED talks about removing the barriers from the physical and digital world? I'll find them and link them when I'm not posting from work. ;)

Mr.Funsocks
08-28-2013, 02:39 PM
Believe it or not, synesthesia is remarkably common, just fairly mild cases. Music with colors is evoked in quite a few people, which is why "the blues" is even a thing. Most people just don't think about it much.

Yoss
08-28-2013, 05:38 PM
A guy at work has synesthesia in the biological way where auditory stimuli also has a taste.
Thought this thread was going to be about how to make Hex 'pretty sweet' in the literal sense. :/
My 2nd girlfriend had visual sensations when receiving auditory stimulation. She loved Pachelbel's "Cannon in D" and was always so sad other people couldn't see it the way she did.