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Slic
09-07-2013, 06:52 AM
Just wanted to ask if HEX is also translated into German ?

Sorry for my bad English

Google translators :)

Shadowelf
09-07-2013, 07:00 AM
It is in their plans to translate the game in other languages, but definitely not till after launch http://www.twitch.tv/weekingeek/b/413067790 check 0:35:10

lite
09-07-2013, 07:16 AM
denke das dauert min noch ein Jahr bis es deutsch wird...

lite

jetah
09-07-2013, 11:18 AM
Google Translate ist sehr gut mit der deutschen. Ich habe meinem Chef, der Deutsch spricht, Österreich deutschen Google bestätigen qualität.

Ich habe auch google übersetzen!

---===---


Google Translate is quite good with German. I've had my boss, who speaks German, Austria German confirm Google quality.

I also used google translate!

blakegrandon
09-07-2013, 11:54 AM
I think it would be interesting if Cryptozoic partnered with Google or Bing to provide localization to different regions. Not sure if that's something that has to be in-house or if it can use software provided by the translating companies.

My coding experience is very limited but apparently translating games is time consuming and costly, or at least that's what Square Enix/Nintento try to tell American Dragon Quest fans... Not that I'm bitter that we constantly get the shaft in the US or anything.

Kroan
09-07-2013, 01:10 PM
Translating a game with google would be very, very horrible. Time for germans to learn english I propose :P

Xenavire
09-07-2013, 01:25 PM
I have an honest question to the German players (and this is not an attack, or calling you out) but why is it so hard for you to learn English? Is there some form of politcal reason, or is it simply not taught in schools? (I am well aware it is not simply restricted to English, but most other languages, but I use English as an example due to it being fairly universal.)

I have visited Germany twice in the last two years, and it is usually possible to find someone who speaks a few words of English or Dutch/Belgian/French, but you meet a large number who speak nothing but German.

Somewhat related, I know some Germans do seem to prefer games and TV/Movies in English (just like some Japanese shows are nicer to watch with subtitles instead of dubbed.) But everything (that I am aware of) is dubbed for German TV, and most games are translated too. But what is the consensus? Do most people enjoy everything being dubbed, or do they dislike it? Or no real preference?

If anyone can give me an answer I would appreciate it. I have never gotten a good answer before (and it just makes me more curious haha.)

jetah
09-07-2013, 05:25 PM
@Xenavire - having worked with Austrians and Germans, they said they are tough (British) English in school. Once out of school, however, they don't really do much with it.

--==--


I don't understand why developers cannot produce an xml (or other file format) for words/phrases that can be translated by the community. The community can download these files and add them in to the client folder, similar to a UI addon, to have any language they want. This allows the community to help the developers in a way a paid translator can't.

A type of Workshop could be opened by the developers to host the translations. The client could display the languages on install/startup asking the user which language they wanted. Once selected, it would inject that translation so the language would change.

hex_colin
09-07-2013, 05:37 PM
I don't understand why developers cannot produce an xml (or other file format) for words/phrases that can be translated by the community. The community can download these files and add them in to the client folder, similar to a UI addon, to have any language they want. This allows the community to help the developers in a way a paid translator can't.

A type of Workshop could be opened by the developers to host the translations. The client could display the languages on install/startup asking the user which language they wanted. Once selected, it would inject that translation so the language would change.

It's really not quite that simple. You have to code the application specifically to allow localization. You need to do the translations for all the UI elements, error messages, help text, tutorials, etc. - and if I were CZE I wouldn't be leaving that up to the community since it would open them up to inappropriate mis-translations, etc.

Most importantly, they have 1500+ cards that they'd need title, text, and color text translations for. Those are tricky and they'd require a LOT of review.

Finally, they have art assets with English text on them - dungeon and raid loading screens, etc. - all of those would need language-specific versions.

They'll get it done eventually - but it's 10's of thousands of dollars they don't need to spend at the beginning when they're trying to get a working version out the door.

jetah
09-07-2013, 05:44 PM
@hex_colin - i understand that. a developer would have to create the client with that idea going into it. I know there would be misinterpretations of items, but if the community could 'fix' or help 'fix' those errors that translation would get better. It would cost upfront to get the client to that point but what's the cost of a full time translator or 3 or 4 or however many translations you'd want.

With a file to translate ANY language could made.

I've read forums where the community would say 'these were translated wrong.. this is what it could be *list 2 or 3 versions'. I've seen complaints saying that a developer shouldn't use google translate.

Xenavire
09-07-2013, 05:48 PM
@Xenavire - having worked with Austrians and Germans, they said they are tough (British) English in school. Once out of school, however, they don't really do much with it.


That does make sense. I was under the impression that they weren't taught it in school at all, but that might be the older generation (whom I hardly see speaking english, while the younger ones I see fairly often.) It was a little hard to communicate when I was at Gamescom last month, but the younger guys and gals were a lot better to try and chat with than the older crowd.

I do hope Gamescom matures over the coming years though - everything was held in german (all the events, all the announcements, all the event timetables) so getting around and attending the events was difficult. I saw a good deal of international visitors, so if they could repeat things in other languages (like the trains do) it would be a massive help. The event itself was awesome though, so the language barrier was a minor inconvenience.

And I have tracked far off topic. Sorry.

jetah
09-07-2013, 05:56 PM
@Xenavire - I noticed the same thing. The younger generation seems to know English better. But I've been surprised by some of the older Germans speaking English very well.

And I've helped wreck this train... sorry.

*taught.. They are taught.. with a t and w/o an o.. bah bad spelling.

Xenavire
09-07-2013, 06:11 PM
@Xenavire - I noticed the same thing. The younger generation seems to know English better. But I've been surprised by some of the older Germans speaking English very well.

And I've helped wreck this train... sorry.

*taught.. They are taught.. with a t and w/o an o.. bah bad spelling.

Heh, I make those spelling mistakes fairly often - I hit edit several times per post on bad days. I need to learn to take my time, but I type far too quickly.

Now, let's get this train back on the rails - I wonder which languages are planned, in the long run. I know the asian countries would require three or more translations (China loves MMO's, Japan has a thing for TCG's, Korea loves F2P, in general) and that could be a big boost to the community. The Phillipenes also have a large presense in some MMO's, and I can see France being a good target as well, along with Russia.

Not to make anyone sad, but I beleive that The Netherlands and Belgium are fine with the English version (they are very good with English compared to some of their closer neighbors).

I have no idea about the rest of the European countries though - Spain might need one, and so may places like Poland, but I have no idea how they fare with English (or the other suggested languages for that matter.)

jetah
09-07-2013, 06:33 PM
Seems that English, German, French are the most popular languages to translate to from a Western view.

I also know that each language Hex is translated into means another market to enter into.

hex_colin
09-07-2013, 06:36 PM
I also know that each language Hex is translated into means another market to enter into.

I think it increases the potential reach in those markets, but being English-only to begin doesn't exclude it per se. Many people in those markets know enough English to easily play Hex. And, even if they don't, the game it pretty easy to follow anyway - I don't think it'll be a major barrier to any foreign language speaker who really wants to play.

Xenavire
09-07-2013, 07:05 PM
I think it increases the potential reach in those markets, but being English-only to begin doesn't exclude it per se. Many people in those markets know enough English to easily play Hex. And, even if they don't, the game it pretty easy to follow anyway - I don't think it'll be a major barrier to any foreign language speaker who really wants to play.

This is true - take Skyrim as a simple example. Germans absolutely love the game, and it is obvious by the huge number of German mods out on the popular modding sites. Guides, full mod translations, mods made from scratch by talented German modders, there is a lot to choose from, and there are several other languages that get the same treatment.

I can easily envision full fansites with complete translated guides, card effects, strats and more, in plenty of languages (and I can see German being one of the most popular of those due to the English speaking ratio's). I am sure they will have amazing community members, just like the English side, who will go the extra mile to make the transition easier.

Kroan
09-07-2013, 10:58 PM
Not to make anyone sad, but I beleive that The Netherlands and Belgium are fine with the English version (they are very good with English compared to some of their closer neighbors). a dutch translation would be hilarous but not used by anyone id wager.

saffamike
09-08-2013, 12:43 AM
It seems pretty common in Europe that the kids speak English pretty well but a lot of adults don't. My grandfather is in the Netherlands and doesn't speak a word of English, but then again he speaks French and German fluently!

A good start would be to offer Spanish, French, German and Russian and then expand to the Asian languages. I'm all for a community-backed effort.

Cazychel
09-08-2013, 07:03 AM
On the long run, translations will surely be good to increase the player base. German, French and Spanish will be the most interesting for the European market - you can easily compare it to the playerbase of Magic, which has translations into these, as well as Russian and I should think Portuguese (if not for Europe, then for South Amerika).

But for now Englisch should suffice to reach a large enough player base to get HEX off the ground.

@Xenavire: Not to get this too much off track again, but at least to clarify: Learning English is mandatory in any German school and they startet teaching it even earlier (in 1st grade, I started in 5th grade back in the days) in the last few years as well, as it's becoming more and more important - at least from the view of globalisation and increasing international relationship. And this has been that way for at least the last 40 years (because my parents learned Englisch, as well). But it is true, that many Germans cannot or refuse to use English (or any other language for that matter), because (a) it is by no means mandatory to actually pass anything (meaning: nobody actually cares if you are able to use English at any rate - as long as you get a good enough grade to pass the school year), (b) many things are translated into German anyway (TV, cinema, books, games, etc.) and you will most likely not have to use it in everyday life and (c) I doubt that in East Germany (the former DDR) English was taught at all before 1989.

In the Magic community on the other hand, there is a large group, who prefer the original English card, because the German translation can be pretty aweful, if not downright unintentionally hilarious. The same is true for many fans of British and American movies and TV shows, who prefer the almost always superior original to the translation. And I do not know if it is me getting old or really the general quality of German dubbed and translated stuff deteriorating.

Okay, enough of that. :-)

Cazy

Shadowelf
09-08-2013, 07:54 AM
On the long run, translations will surely be good to increase the player base. German, French and Spanish will be the most interesting for the European market - you can easily compare it to the playerbase of Magic, which has translations into these, as well as Russian and I should think Portuguese (if not for Europe, then for South Amerika).

Mtg is currently translated in the following languages; German, French, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Portugese, Japanese, Chinese and Korean

(www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr214b )


In the Magic community on the other hand, there is a large group, who prefer the original English card, because the German translation can be pretty aweful, if not downright unintentionally hilarious. The same is true for many fans of British and American movies and TV shows, who prefer the almost always superior original to the translation. And I do not know if it is me getting old or really the general quality of German dubbed and translated stuff deteriorating.

Okay, enough of that. :-)

Cazy

That's true for players, but not for collectors. Did you know that cards in German are more expensive at the secondary market, than their English versions ?

Kroan
09-08-2013, 09:30 AM
That's true for players, but not for collectors. Did you know that cards in German are more expensive at the secondary market, than their English versions ?
I'm pretty sure they're not that far in price. It's just that there is less cards available;
http://www.magiccardmarket.eu

I actually picked up quite a few german cards when I was playing standard, since they were cheaper than the english version

Cazychel
09-08-2013, 09:52 AM
That's true for players, but not for collectors. Did you know that cards in German are more expensive at the secondary market, than their English versions ?

Yeah, depends on where you are in the world. Korean and Japanese cards are the most expensive cards in Germany (okay, maybe generally, as well), German one sell quite high in the US and Japan. Some collectors of course seek foreign cards especially.

But I know some people who actually travel around the world, pick up cards from their home country and sell them, where they are most expensive. This seems to work even better in YuGi-Oh!, where people pay ridiculous amounts of money for English cards in Germany or German cards in the US.

Cazy

Shadowelf
09-08-2013, 10:57 AM
I'm pretty sure they're not that far in price. It's just that there is less cards available;
http://www.magiccardmarket.eu

I actually picked up quite a few german cards when I was playing standard, since they were cheaper than the english version

Yeap that's not true for commons/uncommons (with the exception of foil playable cross-format all stars) and bulk rares. How to evaluate a card usually goes like this ;

1:Language;

From the most valuable to less valuable;

Korean
Japanese
Russian
German

2:Version

Foil/non foil

From the most valuable to less valuable;

Earliest Set
Set
Judge
From the Vault
Magic Player Reward (MPR)
Friday Night Magic (FNM)
Gateway Promo

3:Playability

Cross format all star
Casual appeal

Sources :

http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/finance/23112_Going_Infinite_Language_Redux_And_Introducti on_To_Foils.html
http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/standard/23074_Going_Infinite_Introduction_To_Languages.htm l