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NKenn
02-17-2016, 11:12 PM
Hey everyone. I wanted to ask your advice. I'm about to have the entire DC set; only missing JSA and Docks. My group loves to play with all the cards combined, even with the long 4-6 hour games.

My problem is, things have started to get messy. We're trying to work on house rules for things like confrontation/block cards, and I haven't even read half of the new mechanics for Crisis 2 (barely remember any from Crisis 1, only played it once), Watchmen, Arrow, or Legion.

So 1) what is the best way to play with such a big main deck? I've thought about having 5 "main" decks, 1 for each card type, and having 1-3 of each in the lineup (like 1 location, 3 superpowers/equipments/whatever's most, 2 of everything else, to make 10 total). Then rolling a dice on cards that say "top of the main deck" (maybe 6 be players choice).

2) how does one implement/change so many special rules?

Thanks so much for all yalls help!!

GuruGuru214
02-18-2016, 01:22 AM
We've tried playing with a super large main deck before and found that it's not worth it. Balance goes out the window and games drag on forever. We limit ourselves to one big box, one small box (Crisis/Rivals), and one Crossover in each game, and it works well for us. And with Rivals, we only use the half of the cards that don't mention Confrontations, Block, or character cost, because they really don't work outside of a Rivals game. We don't have every card in every game, but we do see all the cards decently often.

It's up to you, but I think you're going to have a much less enjoyable experience playing with all the cards all at once.

NKenn
02-18-2016, 04:29 AM
I don't know, I think we find it more enjoyable having it all mish-mashed together. We like the craziness, and variety it brings to every game. I like not seeing the same cards every game. That's just our personal opinion though.

Carthain
02-18-2016, 08:14 AM
I have all the cards for the DC sets, except for a couple promos --- and what we do, is I'll from time to time mix & match things to make a new main deck of cards ... and then that changes things up for us so it's almost like we're playing with a new set because we've got different interactions and different things to care about.

It certainly keeps the variation and excitement up for us.

LRoq617
02-18-2016, 01:04 PM
This is pretty close to how I run it. Between an assortment of cards from every set, as well as Street Fighter, I have enough cards for 6 exact 111-card decks, and I reshuffle them out pretty often. There is no balance or rhyme or reason to any of them; it's just... whatever happens happens. Maybe it's just me, but I prefer playing off the cusp like that. It makes things a lot more interesting, and it helps to be able to discover synergies that you may not have known to exist.

unclebill
02-18-2016, 05:12 PM
Ok, this one I can definitely answer.

I've been playing with all of the available dc decks (as they occurred) from the beginning. The trick is like you said, make a separate main-stack for each slot in your line-up. You were very close. All you have to do now is split the main deck by cost. Group 1 & 2 together as well as 6 plus costs. 3, 4, & 5 cost cards each get their own stack. Keep the kicks in their own deck. When a line-up slot is empty refill it from its own stack; however, when there is not a one to one match, the player that just finished his turn decides which stack to fill. If there are already five or more cards in the line-up, do not refill any slots regardless of cost.

Sometimes, a card will require one or more cards from the main-deck. In-general, roll a D5 for each unless it says, "Put them back in any order." or equivalent. For those, still roll the D5 but do the multiple cards from the same stack.

Ok, now for the fun part.
I've also setup the super-villain stack (which I call call the event stack as super-heroes from forever evil can infest) into multiple stacks as well. Usually two is enough. We start each stack with one of the normal starter 8 cost event cards. Here's the trick, both are available for purchase but if either is defeated, and any remain visible, move the visible one to the bottom of its stack. Then, as before, the last player decides which event to reveal first. Resolve the first-appearance attack if any, and then flip the next. This makes defense cards a little more valuable. Enjoy! Optionally, we add another common starter event before any event stack is revealed.

Ok, for confrontation & blocks.
Allow any block to be discarded as a defense. If the block increases a character's cost, instead have it decrease the attacking player's power, even if it makes it negative (ok, may this should be to zero) Treat all of the "during a confrontation" cards as individual one on one attacks that either a defense or a block can whoop. Yes, this means that you can confront more than one player in a turn but all you get is the writing on the card. You could add other stuff like the loser discarding his oversized-card but not really needed.(see below) Confrontation attacks can be either a may or must as your group decides for that game.

Finally,
With the rotating event-deck, we also have any revealing of an event that does not have a first appearance attack as an automatic loss and replacement of everyone's oversize-card. Kinda represents the hero gone searching for one. Anyway, to add a little more strategy, start the game by dealing five or so oversize cards to each player. Then each player discards one of those cards. (There's almost always one card you don't want.) Then when you lose your oversize card to the null first appearance choose another from your super-team to activate. When all of your oversize cards are discarded, draw two, discard one, play one from the remaining unplayed cards. After this, its optional for players to lose & replace their oversize cards. But they lose first then get to choose.

Uncle Bill was here.

P.S. Hi Matt, I explained this all to you at gencon last year. Sorry, we didn't have time to follow up.
Bill

TanisFrey
02-23-2016, 04:12 PM
I have 2 friends with all the sets. One mixes all the sets and then grabs about 100 or so main line up deck. We end up getting a random mix of cards and we cannot predict what will come out. The down side with this style is you cannot choose which of our superheros we get to select from will be best for the game or crippled because a hero from crossover 2 or 3 is missing cards meant to be played with them.

My other friend keeps each set separate and we usually play with one base set, a crises and maybe a crossover.

I have been thinking about how to mix standard DC with rivals. Here is my thoughts on how:

1) Make square cost/VP tokens based on the over-sized rivals heroes cards. You will need one of each for each player in the game: (1) 4 VP Cost 9 (2) 6 VP Cost 12 (3) 8 VP Cost 15
2) Gather up whatever sets you with and shuffle the main deck, place the Kicks, Weakness and hand out starters wot each player.
3) Choose one set (or a mix of them) for the Super Villain stack.
4) Shuffle the over-sized character cards. Hand them out every one will need three of them.
5) Players decide the order of their over-sized characters.
6) One by one the players announce their characters and the order they are in, If there is an objection to the order players vote on changing card order. They should be in order of least to most powerful.
7) All players stack their oversize character and place the square cost/VP tokens.
8) Confrontations are between two players. A defender that looses a confrontation hands victor the square cost/VP token. If the defender looses their last character they are out of the game. These square VP/Cost can only won in this manner and cannot be stolen by cards from Forever Evil that can steal VP tokens.

The game play like normal and ends when any one of three conditions are met: 1) main deck runs out 2) Last Super Villain is bought 3) One player remains.

If only one player remains they win. Other wise add up the VP totals.

Optional Legacy ranking system. Keep a chart of the oversized character played. They get 1 pont for being the top card, 2 points for the second card and 3 points for last card. In a future game these point can be use to determine order of the oversize character cards so votes need only be used it two characters have the same number of points. Other the Character with more points gets put under one with less points.

TanisFrey
02-28-2016, 12:24 PM
I have 2 friends with all the sets. One mixes all the sets and then grabs about 100 or so main line up deck. We end up getting a random mix of cards and we cannot predict what will come out. The down side with this style is you cannot choose which of our superheros we get to select from will be best for the game or crippled because a hero from crossover 2 or 3 is missing cards meant to be played with them.

My other friend keeps each set separate and we usually play with one base set, a crises and maybe a crossover.

I have been thinking about how to mix standard DC with rivals. Here is my thoughts on how:

1) Make square cost/VP tokens based on the over-sized rivals heroes cards. You will need one of each for each player in the game: (1) 4 VP Cost 9 (2) 6 VP Cost 12 (3) 8 VP Cost 15
2) Gather up whatever sets you with and shuffle the main deck, place the Kicks, Weakness and hand out starters wot each player.
3) Choose one set (or a mix of them) for the Super Villain stack.
4) Shuffle the over-sized character cards. Hand them out every one will need three of them.
5) Players decide the order of their over-sized characters.
6) One by one the players announce their characters and the order they are in, If there is an objection to the order players vote on changing card order. They should be in order of least to most powerful.
7) All players stack their oversize character and place the square cost/VP tokens.
8) Confrontations are between two players. A defender that looses a confrontation hands victor the square cost/VP token. If the defender looses their last character they are out of the game. These square VP/Cost can only won in this manner and cannot be stolen by cards from Forever Evil that can steal VP tokens.

The game play like normal and ends when any one of three conditions are met: 1) main deck runs out 2) Last Super Villain is bought 3) One player remains.

If only one player remains they win. Other wise add up the VP totals.

Optional Legacy ranking system. Keep a chart of the oversized character played. They get 1 pont for being the top card, 2 points for the second card and 3 points for last card. In a future game these point can be use to determine order of the oversize character cards so votes need only be used it two characters have the same number of points. Other the Character with more points gets put under one with less points.
Just tried playing this style last night, when well. One change I will make in the future is using hidden super-villans. There was too much incentive to buy super villians and not confront another player.

insightfulstrike
02-29-2016, 07:37 AM
I really like your confrontation/block rule. I've been keeping the rivals cards out of my massive main deck only because I didn't know what to do with them.

With Arrow, I might start including in Street Fighter cards (not locations) into the main deck.