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Thread: *SPOILER ALERT* Accidential Knight discussion-May Contain Spoilers. Read Book First!

  1. #21
    The Transcended
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    It was good as a free book and I am glad I read it, but I'd be upset if I'd paid for it.

    I pretty much agree with everything the others have said here, minus the burning hatred. The book was fast and shallow. If you're expecting the depth of something like Lord of the Rings (or whatever your favorite "real" fantasy is), this book will sorely disappoint. If you're just expecting a fun and empty-headed, made-for-a-game book, then you should end up happy.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Yoss View Post
    It was good as a free book and I am glad I read it, but I'd be upset if I'd paid for it.

    I pretty much agree with everything the others have said here, minus the burning hatred. The book was fast and shallow. If you're expecting the depth of something like Lord of the Rings (or whatever your favorite "real" fantasy is), this book will sorely disappoint. If you're just expecting a fun and empty-headed, made-for-a-game book, then you should end up happy.
    Join the dark side Yoss. Give in to your hatred, for it gives you power. Unlimited Power!!

  3. #23
    Master Theorycrafter
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    I agree with the critiques here that the muddied sense of urgency detracts from the narrative. I did keep asking myself, how fast is Rowan to have traveled so far in a confused near feral state? Why didn't she just power pounce Will from the beginning if she was so fast?

    I also can tell in the novel that the Coyotle battled for being the real stars of the show. Maybe we should have had their perspective more to justify the pacing. If all time happens at once and through eternity how quickly do you really need to move? Humans are more directed and would wear down the horse and use every means available to reach an urgent goal.

    That said the pace was used as the training sequence for Will so he could be less newbsauce in the arena and somewhat competent against the vennen and shin'hare. There is a lot of opportunity available for fleshing out the "villains" in the future at least. Monsuun should have his own book next :-) Make it all journey to the west in style posing the humans and elves as the oni, necrotic and vennen as the various deities. Have it critique the shin'hare cultures while describing their belief systems. Now if I could only write well ...
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  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Mokog View Post
    ...That said the pace was used as the training sequence for Will so he could be less newbsauce in the arena and somewhat competent against the vennen and shin'hare...
    I don't believe that Lady Shimmer could have known that Will would be fighting any of those things.
    And if she did, well, she just became far more... interesting.

  5. #25
    Master Theorycrafter
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCDv57 View Post
    I don't believe that Lady Shimmer could have known that Will would be fighting any of those things.
    And if she did, well, she just became far more... interesting.
    Shimmer wouldn't have known that (but if she did I do agree, more interesting) but the training sequence is a story telling tool to show character growth. For the reader to begin to believe the young mostly untrained knight could stand up to a gladiator of extensive training we had to have some prep work involved. The magic healing diamond gem helped too.
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  6. #26
    Even though I think that it is garbage, Will's link to Rowan line was far more convincing than the training.
    But that's because the training segments were more garbage.

    But what I think you are trying to say is that Will was trained on the road because the story needed that to happen. Not because any of the characters thought it would be a good idea. If The Wolf knights were serious about this, then why did they all just flop about the castle for a week? Why was training Will just as Urgent as finding the doggy? Will would and should have been trained afterwards, and "off-camera" unless the author has actually taken a Historical Martial Arts class or two.

  7. #27
    I'm half way of the book and there are sooo many plot holes, but I'm finding it quite interesting even though is a bit shallow and tries to talk too much. The fact that William knows a lot more than most people about hexes but he never tell us anything interesting about them is so annoying, I guess it is an author/corin decision to choose a better way to create a world around the hex before putting something in the plot that they will regret later...

    Also, I would like to seem William turn into something less knighty, he was a 20yo who never rode a horse or had any military training and seems like he is going full King Arthout, why he can't be like a guy who learns how to fight, but knows he isn't that good so he uses his wolf and his knowledge to help his faction? He turning into a knight and a learn is just so epic, the story doesn't need to be epic to be good.

    I guess the only thing that really get me in the story was the journey, journeys are always cool, but I think the author should had slowed down, developing more the relationship of William with his teacher and about the world that they were walking. I don't remember at any point of any descriptions of roads and people they encounter outside of 'major encounters', seems like they play auto travel until a major decision approached.

  8. #28
    I wanna see William develop into a dead body.
    And then the Necrotic are like, "Hey guys. I know we're all about dead bodies an stuff, but I don't think we should use this one. He was kinda sorta loopy. Like a big ol' basket of organic fruit stuffs. We should really get outta here before that King Gabby guy starts rapping at us again"

  9. #29
    I just finished the book. While it was an ok introduction to the world of Hex, I must mirror others' complains about the book.

    - The writing is sub-par. I'd say the prose is about a step or so above fan fiction.

    - As another poster mentioned, it follows the classic fantasy cliche almost line for line. 'A young boy finds that he has a lordly lineage and joins a diverse group of adventurers and progresses through a series of theme parks to reach their goal, smash through any challenge before them even though they have little experience with no trouble...

    - Race cliches: Flighty elves, angry bloodthirsty orcs, tribal desert-dwellers who have native american rituals and honor the spirits of their ancestors, a shining race of human good guys never even remotely portrayed as possessing the capacity for evil or even so much as misdeeds...

    - The gems: Their usage is never explained. They just fix any problem at any time as the writer needs them to. Their use is NEVER explained, nor are their limitations. A gem that can heal even deadly wounds almost instantly that never runs dry removes pretty much ALL tension from the book. When Rowan was almost killed in the battle with the necrotic, I didn't even bat an eye. 'He'll just heal her with his magical plot device with no drawbacks'. Bad planning, bad writing, utterly yawn-inducing.

    - Will's triumphs are never earned. He just gets everything handed to him. It makes him irritating rather than sympathetic and interesting.

    - The forced romance between Will and Peri and the Lord of the Rings cliche that Shimmer delivers at the end about her living longer as he grows old.

    - The one thing I did enjoy was considering the necrotic and their motivations. I'm almost glad they weren't explained because it likely would have been ham-fisted and poorly done.


    This book, while certainly readable, is the epitome of generic trope-filled, cliche, fantasy pulp. If it wasn't attached to the Hex brand I would never have had the stamina to even bother finishing it.
    Last edited by regomar; 04-02-2015 at 05:31 PM.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by regomar View Post
    I just finished the book. While it was an ok introduction to the world of Hex, I must mirror others' complains about the book.

    - The writing is sub-par. I'd say the prose is about a step or so above fan fiction.

    - As another poster mentioned, it follows the classic fantasy cliche almost line for line. 'A young boy finds that he has a lordly lineage and joins a diverse group of adventurers and progresses through a series of theme parks to reach their goal, smash through any challenge before them even though they have little experience with no trouble...

    - Race cliches: Flighty elves, angry bloodthirsty orcs, tribal desert-dwellers who have native american rituals and honor the spirits of their ancestors, a shining race of human good guys never even remotely portrayed as possessing the capacity for evil or even so much as misdeeds...

    - The gems: Their usage is never explained. They just fix any problem at any time as the writer needs them to. Their use is NEVER explained, nor are their limitations. A gem that can heal even deadly wounds almost instantly that never runs dry removes pretty much ALL tension from the book. When Rowan was almost killed in the battle with the necrotic, I didn't even bat an eye. 'He'll just heal her with his magical plot device with no drawbacks'. Bad planning, bad writing, utterly yawn-inducing.

    - Will's triumphs are never earned. He just gets everything handed to him. It makes him utterly unrepeatable and irritating rather than sympathetic and interesting.

    - The forced romance between Will and Peri and the Lord of the Rings cliche that Shimmer delivers at the end about her living longer as he grows old.

    - The one thing I did enjoy was considering the necrotic and their motivations. I'm almost glad they weren't explained because it likely would have been ham-fisted and poorly done.


    This book, while certainly readable, is the epitome of generic trope-filled, cliche, fantasy pulp. If it wasn't attached to the Hex brand I would never have had the stamina to even bother finishing it.
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