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Thread: *SPOILER ALERT* Accidential Knight discussion-May Contain Spoilers. Read Book First!

  1. #1
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    *SPOILER ALERT* Accidential Knight discussion-May Contain Spoilers. Read Book First!

    Please no major spoilers or plot descriptions! Use good judgement. We all know the story is about the great wolf knights but the antagonists are spoilery as well as who lives and might die during this hero's journey.

    We should probably wait until more people have digested the book but I am just excited to know what parts of the novel excited everyone!

    I fell in love with a flyover scene of the Feralroot woods. Christine Golden's depiction of the elves was different than I expected but in a good way. I first envisioned Shakespeareian elf culture to be like Macbeth or Hamlet but with Midsummer Night's Dream playfulness. I also thought there would be many thee and thou and anachronisms but Christine made the race easy to relate too and referential to the classic elf/pixie with no crazy accents.

    What did people think of how shards were used in the world?
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  2. #2
    Love periwinkle and her lemon trees

  3. #3
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    There should totally be an action called Lemonade: Void target troop, play target troop at the start of your next turn.
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  4. #4
    I feel like the gem usage was... handwaved a bit, there was lots of talk about Williams mastery and understanding of them, and how he probably knew more about them than anyone else present during the adventuring portion, but that never really felt... necessary if you know what I mean. On the other hand part of the lore of hex was that the gems made using magic easy, and opened it to everyone rather than just a few individuals with the wild and blood old magics.
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  5. #5
    Let me start this by saying I really liked the book, enjoyed reading it quite a bit, and I think Christine is excellent at painting vivid pictures and bringing the story and characters to life. It was a very rewarding experience to get our first real taste of the lore and shape of Entrath.

    That being said, I have always had a bit of an issue in fantasy writing with some of the overpoweredness, for lack of a better (or real!) word, of some types of magical powers. I suppose I'm a bit of a traditionalist in this; I prefer the Gandalf approach to wizards and magic - subtle manipulation and knowledge, not flashy fireballs and other nonsense. But many who know me also know that I am a deeply logical person, and I look for logic, reason, and consistency even in fantasy writing. In particular, I have a problem with the whole healing magic thing. It's simply too powerful (and doesn't in any way match the actual effects in game terms).

    If healing diamond gems are so powerful and able to instantly heal any non-fatal wound, wouldn't all humans basically be Highlanders at this point, walking around with a diamond gem strapped to their chest and completely invincible unless you cut their head off at a single stroke? If they are so easy to use, why don't more people make use of them? What are the ramifications of their use? Does their energy get expended? Does it regenerate? How far does their healing go? Does the healing process leave scars? If it completely regenerates the flesh, why doesn't it reverse aging or cure heart conditions?

    This isn't really a complaint about the book itself, but it's something I think a lot of writers and game designers don't necessarily think overmuch about. A lot of this sort of stuff gets handwaved away "because magic," but personally I don't think that's good enough. Another example is how the coyotle ancestor spirits are way, way overpowered in the book compared to how they work in the game. Invincible spirit warriors that can't be harmed anymore but can still have physical impact on the world? Why don't they just fly around and slaughter every vennen, necrotic, and shin'hare on the planet? Nothing can stop them! This kind of thing requires deeper thought. Sure, it sounds cool to have your ancestors fight on your side, but it needs to be reigned in in some way or else it's just ridiculous, and logically inconsistent.

    Reading the book also made me wonder some more about the Hexing gems themselves. Why is it only Diamond gems that can animate a dead body as a Necrotic? Do the Sapphire and Ruby gems have some kind of hive mind or will of their own as well, but not in an animated way? Why do Diamond gems have healing properties if they also have intelligence and will behind them to create Necrotic? The two are polar opposites - reanimating a dead body with the mind of another entity, but also healing wounds and preventing death in the first place? I want to know more about how the gems work - they are all pieces of the Hex comet/meteor, but we know from Will's mental commentary that different shaped ones work in different ways in a recognizable pattern... can the gems be carved or split up to alter their effects further? Or is their current incarnation the only one that can manifest magical power? Does breaking them cause them to become non-functional, or does it change their magical properties?

    On the whole, the book was very enjoyable, and a much higher quality product than you usually see from commissioned, game-related tie-in material. The only real problem is that it raised FAR more new questions than it answered. I want MOAR!
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  6. #6
    Magical healing not being able to Heal age related issues is honestly a very common trope that is well explained I think in any number of scenarios, I mean basically this entire book revolved around William being able to cast soothing breeze, which everyone agrees is a weak spell and not overpowered in the slightest. Your question about all humans effectively being highlanders taken to the logical extreme you have seems a bit silly in that scope. However the underlying question of how access to easy and trivial healing has shaped the mortal races is a good one. I do imagine that the rarer and more powerful eternal youth diamond Gem could create a scenario where there are extremely old humans running around, it doesn't necessarily have to be widespread, though it could be I guess if they wanted to go that route. It doesn't seem like that's the case since it wasn't mentioned with the aging of Williams mentor.

    *edit This was done with text to speech while driving, sorry it's so rambly, I corrected some of the bits that just made it impossible to read.
    Last edited by Gwaer; 11-24-2014 at 04:02 PM.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ossuary View Post
    If healing diamond gems are so powerful and able to instantly heal any non-fatal wound, wouldn't all humans basically be Highlanders at this point, walking around with a diamond gem strapped to their chest and completely invincible unless you cut their head off at a single stroke? If they are so easy to use, why don't more people make use of them? What are the ramifications of their use? Does their energy get expended? Does it regenerate? How far does their healing go? Does the healing process leave scars? If it completely regenerates the flesh, why doesn't it reverse aging or cure heart conditions?
    The first thing we can already conclude is that not all Diamond Gems grant the same abilities or for the same power. This is why we have the cloister studying and classifying the gems, to determine what they can do and how strong they are...

    I'm also expecting some form of "Corrupted Gems" that will grant a strong power, but at a heavy price. It's clear they want to diversify the gems, even within one type.
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  8. #8
    i agree with oss and gwaer about the hexing gems but that was not the only thing glossed over. William's path from monk to knight has a "mighty whitey" trope aspect to it. this is a guy who goes from having never been in a fight (probably) to hero of a large scale battle. it is kind of explained away by training and a link to his martial ancestors through the wolf bond but it never really felt earned to me.
    like zomnivore said in the other book thread TAK suffered a little for being the first introduction to entrath. i enjoyed it for what it is; a quick paced well written book that doesn't need to be thought too deeply about even if i can't help myself and do that anyway.
    it was a great to see some of the big figures in the lore as well.

  9. #9
    I agree with NoahBuddy's comments (and, by extension, ossuary and gwaer's). I liked the characterization enough to overlook some of the plot holes. I'm looking forward to seeing Katak, Daughter of Stars, Periwinkle, Kranok, Will, Rowan, Titania, the Coyotle Bells, The Benevolent Spirits, Eldred and more represented in the game.

    I'm also curious as to how the Vennen, Shin'hare and Dwarves are going to be represented in lore as anywhere near being a sympathetic group. Admittedly, that's like asking how Keynsians could possible be considered rational after finishing an economic degree at U of Chicago, but it'll be an open question and one I look forward to seeing how it's answered.

  10. #10
    I wasn't particularly impressed with the book. It has many of the failings of 80s/90s fantasy. Stop me if you've heard this one before.
    A diverse group go on a journey to stop evil. Along the way they face several challenges but ultimately many of them remain static even after their journey. What limited character development there is, is not earned and is only there because the plot demands it.

    One example is Will's "leadership". Everyone defers to him and all of the more knowledgeable members simply allow him to make that decision regarding Katak. The laughably weak protests the other members make actually just weaken them as characters because they come off as incompetent. Will even bosses some of them around (including orcs that should be under Kranok's command).
    The only reason he was put in that position was because he's the protagonist but he hasn't yet actually earned the distinction naturally. The same reason the Katak decision is allowed to happen is because they needed the ending (gathering of most/all interested parties in a large scale fight is another common trope) battle.

    The book is simply mediocre which is probably fine for a novel based on a game. It's not going to impress avid fantasy readers but at least it isn't out right terrible.

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